What Is a BSOD?



“BSOD”, stands for “Blue Screen Of Death”.

unmountable-boot-volume

And yes, most likely you have encountered the dreaded BSOD, provided you are running a computer.

But wait, you never found out what caused that BSOD. Chance’s are you still can.
If you haven’t ran any cleaning program’s like CCleaner, that mini dump file still exsist on your computer. You can veiw that mini dump file and determine what caused your computer to crash.
After your system has recovered and you are now logged onto your Windows “OS”, just run BlueScreenVeiw. –
BlueScreenView v1.55 – Copyright (c) 2009 – 2015 Nir Sofer –

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FROM: Nirsoft

“BlueScreenView scans all your minidump files created during ‘blue screen of death’ crashes, and displays the information about all crashes in one table. For each crash, BlueScreenView displays the minidump filename, the date/time of the crash, the basic crash information displayed in the blue screen (Bug Check Code and 4 parameters), and the details of the driver or module that possibly caused the crash (filename, product name, file description, and file version). For each crash displayed in the upper pane, you can view the details of the device drivers loaded during the crash in the lower pane. BlueScreenView also mark the drivers that their addresses found in the crash stack, so you can easily locate the suspected drivers that possibly caused the crash.”

It may be best to run BlueScreenView while in “Safe Mode”, that way you can treat the cause of that BSOD from there without any restrictions, such as uninstalling the culprit that isn’t running in safe mode.

Only a certain amount of Windows drivers run in safe mode, and most likely they aren’t the reason for the BSOD. Perhaps you installed a thrid party program that had injected its own drivers -into the “OS”- for it to run properly. But, the driver wasn’t compatible for your system, hence a BSOD.

Anyway, this handy little tool will help you fix the problem. Hasn’t failed me yet, as long as the mini dump file is still in my system, I can take care of the problem with a success rate of 100%.

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BlueScreenView Features

Automatically scans your current minidump folder and displays the list of all crash dumps, including crash dump date/time and crash details. Allows you to view a blue screen which is very similar to the one that Windows displayed during the crash. BlueScreenView enumerates the memory addresses inside the stack of the crash, and find all drivers/modules that might be involved in the crash.
BlueScreenView also allows you to work with another instance of Windows, simply by choosing the right minidump folder (In Advanced Options). BlueScreenView automatically locate the drivers appeared in the crash dump, and extract their version resource information, including product name, file version, company, and file description.

System Requirements

BlueScreenView works with Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10, as long as Windows is configured to save minidump files during BSOD crashes. If your system doesn’t create MiniDump files on a blue screen crash, try to configure it according to the following article: How to configure Windows to create MiniDump files on BSOD BlueScreenView can read the MiniDump files of both 32-bit and x64 systems.Be aware that on Windows 10, some of the created MiniDump files might be empty and BlueScreenView will not display them. BlueScreenView doesn’t require any installation process or additional dll files. In order to start using it, simply run the executable file – BlueScreenView.exe After running BlueScreenView, it automatically scans your MiniDump folder and display all crash details in the upper pane.


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